FirstNet

Posted by & filed under Public Safety.

FirstNet has built a new Band Class 14 network for first responders

 

The network is designed to be more reliable, safe, and secure while offering optimal functionality.

This new network marks the first time that public safety communications will be based on commercial standards, bringing about lower costs and increased ability for advanced emergency communications.

The FirstNet Band Class 14 network stems from public safety findings that were identified in the 9/11 Commission Report; the report noted significant gaps in emergency communications and recommended the development of a nationwide network for first responders and other public safety officials. Due to the advocacy efforts of public safety organizations and associations, Congress passed legislation in 2012 to create the First Responder Network Authority to deploy the FirstNet network throughout the United States.

Working closely with public safety officials since 2012, the First Responder Network Authority has been ensuring that the network fully meets current and future needs of first responders. The Band Class 14 network is designed to be a “fast lane” for first responders and public safety officials, bypassing the typical wireless communications overload caused by heavy public use. The network will provide a highly secure, encrypted channel of communications for emergency personnel that will be inaccessible as a public wireless network. In addition, it will also create device and app systems that will allow first responders to connect to innovative and vital technologies.

FirstNet is improving communications to allow for quicker emergency response times and outcomes for first responders nationwide, which will contribute to having safer communities. First responders will be able to take advantage of innovative tools and services during emergencies, such as apps that will allow for reliable real-time capture of video, text messages, and photos. There will be improved location services to allow for greater mapping capabilities during search and rescue operations, as well as deployables for use in both planned and unplanned emergency events. The First Responder Network has been testing and validating the full range of products and services prior to deployment to make sure that first responders across the nation will have effective and reliable tools during disasters and emergencies.

Partnering with AT&T to leverage private sector resources, The First Responder Network is modernizing and improving communication capabilities at a fraction of the cost to American taxpayers. With this public-private partnership, there’s no need for additional federal funding to build and operate the network; additionally, first responders will have access to far superior communications services than what they currently have. All 50 states, five US territories, and Washington DC have opted into FirstNet and accepted their individual state plans that detail how the network will be deployed.

Remote Satellite Systems is now supporting First Net with new satellite terminals, the Harrier 1.2m and Harrier .85 Fly-Away antenna kits. These terminals integrate both LTE satellite and Band 14 communications with least cost-routing technology, enabling first responders to maintain critical communications on a variety of networks. Both models are fully self-contained, highly portable and quick to deploy in 10 minutes or less. They have an available bandwidth of 20 Mbps x 5 Mbps via satellite, and our powerful fully redundant satellite and ground station infrastructure with multiple satellite look angles with no IP reconfiguration. The Harrier antennas meet both the weight and dimension requirements for commercial airlines, making it easy to transport them wherever you go. They’re also cellular extender-compatible, making them capable of providing service to handsets even where there’s no cellular infrastructure.

Contact us to learn more about the Harrier Fly Away antennas, Band 14 network support, or to discuss your needs with one of our satellite experts.